Meteor Showers — The Iron of the Gods Against Anxiety and Fear

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Every year the cosmic iron enters Earth atmosphere. Meteor showers happen on a yearly basis, following the rhythms of the cosmos. With them they bring iron, and the forces harnessed in it. But why is that? What’s the reason behind this charming show that makes us make wishes? And what does all this have to do with iron?

According to the Catholic lore august meteor shower are the “lacrime di San Lorenzo”—St. Lowrence’s tears. These meteors are known as the Perseids because the point from which they appear to hail lies in the constellation Perseus.

Picture of the Cosmos full of Meteor Showers
PICTURE OF Sam Willis BY Pexels

This correspondence with the myth is very interesting. And as we are going to show later on, it finds a valid explanation in the results of a spiritual-scientific investigation.

Picture of Medusa's Head

Perseus and Medusa

Everybody knows Medusa, one of the three monstrous Gorgons, human females with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Perseus was the hero who confronted her terrible gaze which had the power to turn men into stone.

Actually, the story of Medusa is truly tragic. It is impossible not to empathize with her. Raped by Neptune in the temple of Athena, she was then cursed by the goddess who held her responsible. She turned her into a monster, her hair became snakes and her gaze capable of petrifying men with a single glance.

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Stargazing: August 2016 Celestial Events

Reading Time : 2 minutesmtor

July 28, 29 – Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower

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Delta Aquarids meteor shower takes place every year from about July 12 to August 23. Its nominal peak occurs around July 28-29, during which we can observe up to 20 meteors per hour. The moon is waning, so its slender crescent shouldn’t get in the way too much.


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August 11, 12 – Perseids Meteor Shower

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Probably the most famous meteor shower, Perseids are traditionally known as Tears of Saint Lawrence. They are the easiest to spot since during their peak they produce up to 60 falling stars per hour. Just look toward Cassiopeia—the W-shaped constellation—during the night of August 11 and enjoy the show.


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August 16 – Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation

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On August 16, Mercury reaches maximum distance away from the Sun. This means it can be spotted by the naked eye, looking to the western horizon just after sunset. Since its light is very weak, you can use Jupiter and Venus as a reference.


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August 27 – Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter

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On August 27 we are going to see a rare phenomenon: Venus and Jupiter are going to be just 0.06 degrees from one another—so close that (for the naked eye) they are going to merge together in a single star! Don’t miss it!